Find Your Routine

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Being organized requires some level of maintenance –regardless of your brain type or style. Dread of decluttering or organizing can lead to procrastination or paralysis for some.

Twyla Tharp wrote a beautiful book on creativity: The Creative Habit, Learn It and Use It for Life. To me, it speaks so keenly to the trouble we often have waiting OUTSIDE a process — she names the creative process. I see it easily translates into the decluttering/organizing process. For each, we must find our own flow, our own rhythm, our own dialogue through the decision-making process inherent in each.

start

Here is a quote from her book. I will list it twice, once verbatim, and a second time, substituting words to describe the decluttering/organizing process.

“In the end, there is no one ideal condition for creativity. What works for one person is useless for another. The only criterion is this: Make it easy on yourself. Find a working environment where the prospect of wrestling with your muse doesn’t scare you, doesn’t shut you down. It should make you want to be there, and once you find it, stick with it. To get the creative habit, you need a working environment that’s habit-forming.

All preferred working states, no matter how eccentric, have one thing in common, they impel you to get started. Whether it’s the act of carrying a hot coffee mug to an outdoor porch, or the rock ‘n’ roll that gets a painter revved up to splash color on a canvas…moving inside each of these routines gives you no choice but to do something. It’s Pavlovian: follow the routine, get a creative payoff.”  The Creative Habit: Learn It and Use It for Life, p. 17-18

And now with substitutions:

“In the end, there is no one ideal condition for [decluttering or organizing]. What works for one person is useless for another. The only criterion is this: Make it easy on yourself. Find a working environment where the prospect of wrestling with your [clutter/mail/schedule] doesn’t scare you, doesn’t shut you down. It should make you want to be there, and once you find it, stick with it. To get the [organizing] habit, you need a working environment that’s habit-forming.

All preferred working states, no matter how eccentric, have one thing in common, they impel you to get started. Whether it’s the act of carrying a hot coffee mug to an outdoor porch, or the rock ‘n’ roll that gets a painter revved up to splash color on a canvas…moving inside each of these routines gives you no choice but to do something. It’s Pavlovian: follow the routine, get a [clarity] payoff.”  The Creative Habit: Learn It and Use It for Life, p. 17-18

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